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Mary Martin and Ethel Merman – Medley on TV in 1953

download (2)In 1953, Mary Martin and Ethel Merman sang a medley on live TV, reprising not only their greatest hits, but also summarizing the entire history of Tin Pan Alley and Broadway from the early 1900s to 1950.

It took me a little while, but I think I’ve accounted for all the songs that they touch on during the 12 minute medley (some of which they only sing for a few seconds). If I missed any songs, please let me know! I’ve tried to provide the exact time on the video when they sing each song and also indicated who sings which songs, though I have not listed reprises of songs. Near the end, there is overlap, as both Ethel Merman and Mary Martin take turns singing various songs while the other sings “Tea for Two,” then they both sing “Tea for Two” together.

  • 1946 – “There’s No Business Like Show Business” from Broadway Annie Get Your Gun (Irving Berlin) – [Ethel Merman: 0.13]
  • 1949 – “I’m In Love With a Wonderful Guy” from  Broadway South Pacific (Rodgers and Hammerstein) – [Mary Martin: 2.13]  
  • 1909 – “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” (Gus Edwards, Edward Madden), seems like ultimate nostalgia song – [Ethel Merman: 3:28]
  • 1905 – “Wait Until the Sun Shines, Nellie” (Harry von Tilzer, Andrew B. Sterling), Mary Martin sang this song with Bing Crosby in Birth of the Blues in 1945 – [Mary Martin: 3.43]
  • 1921 – “The Sheik of Araby” (Ted Snyder, Harry B. Smith and Francis Wheeler), popular around the same time as Rudolph Valentino – Ethel Merman: [3.58]
  • 1926 – “When the Red, Red Robin (Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin’ Along)” (Harry Woods), Lillian Roth was known for this song, it also inspired the restaurant chain, Red Robin – [Mary Martin and Ethel Merman: 4.20]
  • 1912 – “My Melancholy Baby” (Ernie Burnett, George A. Norton), also sung in Birth of the Blues – [Mary Martin: 5.05]
  • 1913 – “You Made Me Love You” (James V. Monaco, Joseph McCarthy), Al Jolson, Judy Garland both remembered for this song – [Ethel Merman: 5.42]
  • “1927 – “Mississippi Mud” (Harry Barris), Bing Crosby introduced this song while with The Rhythm Boys – [Mary Martin: 6.16]
  • 1923 –  “I Cried for You” (Arthur Freed, Abe Lyman, Gus Arnheim) – [Ethel Merman: 6.45]
  • 1918 – “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles” (John Kellette, James Kendis, James Brockman and Nat Vincent) – [Mary Martin: 6.49]
  • 1917 – “I’m Always Chasing Rainbows” (Harry Carroll, Joseph McCarthy adapted from Chopin’s Fantaisie- Impromptu) – [Ethel Merman: 6.54]
  • 1935 – “I’m in the Mood for Love” (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields), Frances Langford introduced it in the movie Every Night at Eight – [Mary Martin: 6.58]
  • 1931 – “I Love a Parade” (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler), in movie Manhattan Parade – [Ethel Merman: 7.03]
  • “I’d Climb the Highest Mountain” (Lew Brown, Sidney Clare) – best I can find, it was written in 1926, though Ricky Nelson seems to have made int his own after 1953 – Jolson sang it in 1926 – [Mary Martin: 7.07]
  • 1925 – “I’m Sitting on Top of the World” (Ray Henderson, Sam M. Lewis, Joe Young), Jolson best known for this song, he also sang it in The Singing Fool, his follow-up to The Jazz Singer – [Ethel Merman: 7.11]
  • 1929 – “I Got a Feeling You’re Fooling” (Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed), introduced in The Hollywood Revue of 1929 – [Mary Martin: 7.16]
  • 1928 – “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, Baby” (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) – [Ethel Merman: 7.21]
  • 1928 – “I’ll Get By (As Long as I Have You)” (Fred E. Ahlert, Roy Turk), Billie Holiday best known for recording it – [Mary Martin: 7.25]
  • 1950 – “You’re Just in Love” (Irving Berlin), Ethel Merman introduced it on Broadway in Call Me Madam, also in 1953 movie adaptation – [Ethel Merman: 7.30]
  • 1949 – “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair” (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein), Mary Martin introduced song in South Pacific on Broadway – [Mary Martin: 7.34]
  • 1934 – “I Get a Kick Out of You” (Cole Porter), introduced by Ethel Merman in Broadway musical Anything Goes – [Ethel Merman: 7.44]
  • 1936 – “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (Cole Porter), introduced in movie Born to Dance by Virginia Bruce – [Mary Martin: 8.08]
  • 1938 – “My Heart Belongs to Daddy” (Cole Porter), Broadway musical Leave It To Me! was Mary Martin’s Broadway debut, where she introduced the song – [Mary Martin: 8.36]
  • 1930 – “I Got Rhythm” (George and Ira Gershwin), Broadway musical Girl Crazy, Ethel Merman’s Broadway debut, introduced song, musical also made Ginger Rogers a star – [Ethel Merman: 9.38]
  • 1924 – “Indian Love Call” (Rudolph Friml, Herbert Stothart), Broadway operetta Rose-Marie, immortalized on screen by Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in 1936 movie adaptation for everlasing lampooning – [Mary Martin: 10.23]
  • 1925 – “Tea for Two” (Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar), Broadway musical No, No Nanette – another standard that feels like the ultimate nostalgia song – [Ethel Merman and Mary Martin: 10.23]
  • 1933 – “Stormy Weather” (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) introduced by Ethel Waters, Lena Horne also known for song in 1943 movie of the same name – Ethel Merman: [10.47]
  • 1932 – “Isn’t It Romantic?” (Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart), introduced in 1932 film Love Me Tonight by Maurice Chevalier – Mary Martin: [11.10]

The amazing thing is that there was still more Broadway history to go. In 1953, Mary Martin had still not essayed Peter Pan (1954) or The Sound of Music (1959) and Gypsy (1959) was still in the future for Ethel Merman, as well.

 
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Posted by on July 6, 2016 in Music

 

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Video

“You’re the Top”

So, I’m taking a brief break from my blog. A dearth of ideas (I’m clearly not watching enough movies right now) coupled with a busier week than usual has resulted in little blogging. I was straining to think of something for Friday, but then it occurred to me that chatter for the sake of chatter probably does not make for compelling reading. But I will be back Monday…and will still be online reading blog posts.

However, today I thought I would post a song that I absolutely adore. I’m in the process of learning the lyrics. At the moment, I keep singing the first few verses ad nauseam. “You’re the Top” was written by Cole Porter for his 1934 musical, “Anything Goes.” It was introduced by Ethel Merman. The musical never did get a good film adaptation, but has been revived multiple times on Broadway, most recently in 2011. I even got to see it once in Seattle (though I thought the tap dancing was a bit flaccid, but perhaps my standards are a bit high).

The lyrics are delightful, but filled with so many contemporary allusions that I went in search of an article that provides historical annotations to the lyrics, which I definitely recommend reading.

Here is a somewhat bleary video featuring Ethel Merman and Bing Crosby in the less than faithful 1936 film adaptation (half the songs were apparently removed to make way for songs written specifically for Crosby). But the rapport between them is fun. The lyrics have, however, been considerably modified.

And Ethel Merman again in a 1934 recording.

And I can’t leave out Ella Fitzgerald. She is pure pleasure to listen to.

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2016 in Music

 

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Born to Dance (1936) – Eleanor Powell, Cole Porter, and Jimmy Stewart sings and dances…sort of

Born_to_Dance_-_1936-_PosterMy admittedly limited experience with Eleanor Powell musicals from MGM is that they are a mishmash of music, comedic routines, dancing numbers, general extravaganza and a dash of plot just to keep things interesting. Born to Dance, made in 1936 with songs by Cole Porter, is fairly typical of the genre. It was the second movie Eleanor Powell made with MGM and her first starring role, with her name above the title, even.

Eleanor Powell is possibly one of the finest tap dancers to appear in any Hollywood musical, ranking up there with Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire in sheer skill, though perhaps less adept as an actress. However, like Kelly and and Astaire, she did all her own choreography. As much as I enjoy her dancing, however, I’ve found that since she can’t be dancing all the time, my enjoyment of an Eleanor Powell vehicle depends somewhat on who the side characters are and the cast in Born to Dance is quite good: James Stewart, Una Merkel, Buddy Ebsen, Virginia Bruce, Sid Silvers.

Eleanor Powell is Nora Paige, who’s come to the city to find work as a dancer. She stumbles upon the Lonely Hearts Club, run by Jenny Saks (Una Merkel) who feels sympathy for a fellow female struggling in the big city and lets her stay…if she’ll do a dance or two. Also arrivning in New York City is a submarine with sailors Ted Barker (James Stewart), Mush Tracy (Buddy Ebsen) and Gunny Saks (Sid SIlvers), who’s married to Jenny Saks but hasn’t seen her for four years since he’s been in the navy and doesn’t know that Jenny has had his child.

Frances Langford, Buddy Ebsen, Eleanor Powell, James Stewart, Una Merkel, Gunny Saks

Frances Langford, Buddy Ebsen, Eleanor Powell, James Stewart, Una Merkel, Sid Silvers

All three men come to the Lonely Hearts Club and romances generally ensue, though Jenny doesn’t tell Gunny about his child yet because she is still not really sure if she wants to take him back after a four year absence. Ted and Nora fall in love, but complications come into their life in the shape of a Broadway star named Lucy James (Virginia Bruce), who sets her sights on Ted. And of course, Nora gets a job as Lucy’s understudy and one can see where this is going.

Having just seen James Stewart in Vertigo, I can’t think of a more different film than Born to Dance. Cole Porter chose Stewart for the role. He’d never been a leading man in an MGM film before – he wouldn’t be a star until Frank Capra’s 1938 You Can’t Take it With You –  and Porter thought that he could play the role well. And although Eleanor Powell’s voice was dubbed, surprisingly, Stewart does his own singing in the film and even introduces the great standard “Easy to Love.” He has a pleasant enough voice, though somewhat inadequate for Porter’s song. He can’t exactly dance, either, but at least he’s enthusiastic and good-humored in his attempts. Still, it was rather fun to see him at the beginning of his career in a genre that you don’t usually see him in.

Eleanor Powell

Eleanor Powell

The movie introduced two songs that would go on to be standards in The Great American Songbook: “Easy to Love” and “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” and also other catchy ones like “Hey, Babe, Hey.” It seems that Cole Porter not only wrote the songs, but also the score for the film, though there were other people around to orchestrate and and arrange. The 1930s was an extremely fruitful decade for Porter, where many of his greatest songs were written.

The dancing and the songs are where the movie really shines. The plot’s a bit corny, but it’s never dull. And if you like dancing and songs, this is a good film to find it in.

This first video is of Frances Langford, Buddy Ebsen, Eleanor Powell, James Stewart, Una Merkel, and Sid Silvers singing and dancing in “Hey, Babe, Hey.” Buddy Ebsen and Sid Silvers are encountering more resistance than James Stewart in their attempts at wooing.

And a clip of Eleanor Powell dancing. She is still the understudy at this point, but one can tell she won’t be for long.

And James Stewart introduces “Easy to Love.” Cole Porter said, “…Stewart came over to the house and I heard him sing. He sings far from well, although he has nice notes in his voice, but he could play the part perfectly.”

Ella Fitzgerald sings “Easy to Love” a good deal better.

And Frank Sinatra singing “I’ve Got You Under My Skin.” which was introduced in the film by Virginia Bruce, who sang it to Jimmy Stewart

 

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